The State of Healthcare in Africa

by KPMG Africa Limited, 2012

12 pp. 588 kB
https://www.kpmg.com/Africa/en/IssuesAndInsights/Articles-
Publications/Documents/The-State-of-Healthcare-in-Africa.pdf
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Health indicators in Africa are shocking. Africans live, on average, 14 years less than the average world citizen, and 21 years less than the average European. The maternal mortality and the mortality rate for children younger than five years are more than double the world average. There are only 2.3 doctors per 1,000 people in Africa, less than one tenth of the figure in Europe and less than half the figure in South-East Asia. It is important to consider the reasons why this is so. By far the most important reason is the way in which healthcare in Africa is funded. As “The Economist” puts it, healthcare funding in Africa is a “patchwork of meagre public spending, heavy reliance on foreign donors and a large dependence on out-of-pocket contributions and user fees that place the greatest burden on the poorest members of society.”

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