Using Mobile Phones as Acoustic Sensors for High-Throughput Surveillance of Mosquito Ecology

by Haripriya Mukundarajan, Felix J H Hol, Erica A Castillo et al.
bioRxiv preprint first posted online March 25, 2017

38 pp. 13.8 MB
http://biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2017/03/25/120519.full.pdf

The lack of high-resolution field data on the abundance, species and distribution of mosquitoes is a serious impediment to effective control of mosquito-borne disease, yet the availability of high-throughput, low-cost surveillance techniques remains a bottleneck in generating such data. Here, the authors establish that commercially available mobile phones (including low-cost basic models) are a powerful tool to probe mosquito activity, by sensitively acquiring acoustic data on their species-specific wingbeat sounds, together with the time and location of the human-mosquito encounter.

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