by George Wanje, Linnet Masese, Ethel Avuvikaet al.
Reproductive Health, 2017 14:95 – Published: 14 August 2017

11 pp. 412 kB
https://reproductive-health-journal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12978-017-
0360-z?site=reproductive-health-journal.biomedcentral.com

To successfully develop and implement school-based sexual health interventions for adolescent girls, such as screening for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, it is important to understand parents’ and teachers’ attitudes towards sexual health education and acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening interventions. In this African setting, parents and teachers provide limited sexual health education, with a focus on negative consequences including loss of virginity, pregnancy, and risk for STIs. Nonetheless, both parents and teachers were supportive of STI screening for adolescent girls, beginning with school-based informational meetings for the girls. Research and programs that aim to provide STI screening in this setting must offer treatment and address the issue of whether results will be disclosed to parents.

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