Online course: Global Health and Disability

Leaving no one behind: disability, health and wellbeing in global development

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Around 15% of the world’s population, or 1 billion people, live with some form of disability, with numbers continuing to rise over the coming decades. The three week course aims to raise awareness about the importance of health and well-being of people with disabilities in the context of the global development agenda: Leaving no one behind.

For more information see:
https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/global-disability

Start: 4 June 2018
Duration 3 weeks
4 hours per week
Learn for free or Upgrade for €54

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New Global Health eLearning Center Course: Postabortion Care (PAC)

USAID’s PAC model – Time: 3 hours

https://www.globalhealthlearning.org/course/postabortion-care-pac

The Global Health eLearning Center is the primary learning destination for leaders and experts in the field of international health for development! Postabortion care provides a package of family planning and other services for women having complications from a miscarriage, incomplete abortion, or induced abortion. This course provides an overview of postabortion care and the evidence behind it, best practices for programming, and indicators for monitoring and evaluation.

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Dispelling myths about drug procurement policy

by Marcel van Valen, David Jamieson, Lisa Parvin et al.
The Lancet Global Health, Vol. 6, No. 6, e609–e610, June 2018

2 pp. 40.6 kB
https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/langlo/PIIS2214-109X(18)30190-6.pdf

Drug prices are controversial in all countries, and nowhere more so than in low-income and middle-income countries, where access to essential drugs is very price sensitive. The higher the price, the fewer the patients who can be treated, so therefore the aim is to maintain drug prices consistently low. However, it is unclear whether the lowest price for a drug will always be the best value, and it is an issue that many purchasers must consider. Will quality be compromised? Will the bidder offering the lowest price be able to deliver on time and in full? Unsatisfactory answers to these key questions will put lives at risk

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Education Under Attack 2018

by Amy Kapit, Andrea Mazzarino, Cristal Downing et al.
Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack, 2018

312 pp. 14.2 MB
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/eua_2018_full_0.pdf

This study is the fourth in a series of publications examining attacks on education, including the threat of or actual use of force against students, teachers, professors, and other education personnel, or educational facilities and materials. The research carried out for this report suggests that violence against students, educators, and their institutions has spread geographically and appears to have increased in some countries since the period from 2009 to mid-2013 covered in the last edition of Education under Attack. From January 2013 to December 2017, the period covered in this report, 41 countries experienced more than 5 attacks on education in which at least one incident was a direct attack or killed at least one person. This represents 11 more countries than in the previous report.

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COORDINATE, INTEGRATE, INVEST: How joint child health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions can deliver for your country’s future

WaterAid and PATH’s Defeat Diarrheal Disease (Defeat DD) Initiative, 2018

12 pp. 759 kB
https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/WA_PATH_Coordinate%20Integ
rate%20Invest_EN.pdf

Combining clean water, decent household toilets and good hygiene with routine childhood vaccinations and nutrition support could potentially save the lives of as many as 697,000 young children annually, and prevent billions of harmful bouts of diarrhoeal illness and pneumonia in under-fives each year, new research from WaterAid and PATH has found. Ensuring 100% coverage with water, sanitation and hygiene, rotavirus vaccination and nutritional interventions such as breastfeeding promotion and zinc supplements could potentially reduce illness by nearly two thirds (63%) and almost halve the number of child deaths (49%) from diarrhoea and pneumonia, the analysis estimates.

Posted in Essential Medicines, Food & Nutrition, General, Global Health, Maternal & Child Health, Other Infectious Diseases, Water, Sanitation & Hygiene | Comments Off on COORDINATE, INTEGRATE, INVEST: How joint child health and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions can deliver for your country’s future

Accelerate progress – sexual and reproductive health and rights for all: report of the Guttmacher–Lancet Commission

by Ann M Starrs, Alex C Ezeh, Gary Barker et al.
The Lancet, Published Online May 9, 2018

51 pp. 1.8 MB
https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(18)30293-9.pdf

Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are fundamental to people’s health and survival, to economic development, and to the wellbeing of humanity. Several decades of research have shown – and continue to show – the profound and measurable benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health. Through international agreements, governments have committed to such investment. Yet progress has been stymied because of weak political commitment, inadequate resources, persistent discrimination against women and girls, and an unwillingness to address issues related to sexuality openly and comprehensively. This report proposes a comprehensive and integrated definition of SRHR and recommends an essential package of SRHR services and information that should be universally available.

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Overcoming Family Planning Challenges in Africa: Toward Meeting Unmet Need and Scaling Up Service Delivery

by Andrzej Kulczycki
African Journal of Reproductive Health, March 2018; 22 (1):9

11 pp. 577 kB
https://www.ajol.info/index.php/ajrh/article/download/169831/159272

Unmet need refers to the percentage of sexually active, fecund women who want no more children or to postpone having their next child, but who are not using contraception. It is an important indicator used for tracking progress, measured using an algorithm based on a set of standardized survey questions. Traditional method users tend to have high failure rates and are considered to have an unmet need for a more effective method, lowering the percentage of demand for family planning satisfied with modern contraceptive methods. Gaps in meeting women‘s needs persist especially among the poor, young, less educated and underserved with high fertility preferences. The level of unmet need is highest (21%) in sub-Saharan Africa and is 25% or higher in middle and western Africa, where the values estimated for 2010 were nearly identical to those in 1990.

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A demographic dividend of the FP2020 Initiative and the SDG reproductive health target: Case studies of India and Nigeria

by Qingfeng Li and Jose G. Rimon
Gates Open Research 2018, 2:11, Last updated: 27 April 2018

10 pp. 958 kB
https://dqo52087pnd5x.cloudfront.net/manuscripts/13867/abb3547e-ba5f-458c-948b-
44bc46a150c5_12803_-_Qingfeng_Li.pdf?doi=10.12688/gatesopenres.12803.1

The demographic dividend, defined as the economic growth potential resulting from favourable shifts in population age structure following rapid fertility decline, has been widely employed to advocate improving access to family planning. The current framework focuses on the long-term potential, while the short-term benefits may also help persuade policy makers to invest in family planning. The tremendous economic benefits from meeting the FP2020 and SDG family planning targets demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of investment in promoting access to contraceptive methods

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Giving Antibiotics To Healthy Kids In Poor Countries: Good Idea Or Bad Idea?Giving Antibiotics To Healthy Kids In Poor Countries: Good Idea Or Bad Idea?Giving Antibiotics To Healthy Kids In Poor Countries: Good Idea Or Bad Idea?

by Susan Brink
Goats and Soda, April 25, 2018

Read online at:
https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/04/25/605741439/giving-antibiotics-
to-healthy-kids-in-poor-countries-good-idea-or-bad-idea

What if a simple intervention could save tens of thousands of those children? Seems like a no-brainer — unless the method used to save them puts tens of thousands of others at risk in the future. That’s the dilemma presented by a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers enrolled 190,238 healthy children and, over a period of two years, gave half of them four doses of the antibiotic azithromycin and half of them a placebo. The results showed a 14 percent reduction in deaths among children age five and younger who received the antibiotic, though the researchers don’t know exactly why the antibiotics had this effect. But there’s a potential trade-off. Giving antibiotics to a community of healthy children could eventually result in a number of diseases becoming resistant to those drugs.

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Azithromycin to Reduce Childhood Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa

by Jeremy D. Keenan, Robin L. Bailey, Sheila K. West et al.
N Engl J Med 2018; 378:1583-1592, April 26, 2018

10 pp. 318 kB
https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1715474

The authors hypothesized that mass distribution of a broad-spectrum antibiotic agent to preschool children would reduce mortality in areas of sub-Saharan Africa that are currently far from meeting the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. They conclude that among postneonatal, preschool children in sub-Saharan Africa, childhood mortality was lower in communities randomly assigned to mass distribution of azithromycin than in those assigned to placebo, with the largest effect seen in Niger. Any implementation of a policy of mass distribution would need to strongly consider the potential effect of such a strategy on antibiotic resistance.

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